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The Twilight Zone episode “The Howling Man” first aired on November 4, 1960 — the fifth episode of the series’ second season. The story was written by Charles Beaumont, who was responsible for penning more than twenty TZ scripts, including “Long Distance Call”, “Long Live Walter Jameson“, “Miniature“, and the haunting “Perchance to Dream“.

If you found the Devil locked in a cage, would you let him out? Could you be convinced that it was him? Would you be swayed by his gentle demeanour? And fooled by his choice words? “The Howling Man” explores those very questions. It asks, “Do you believe?”

Wrought with wonderfully blatant Christian overtones, “The Howling Man” is my favourite episode of the Twilight Zone. To celebrate its 53rd anniversary today, I have a treat for all the serious TZ fans: the full “Howling Man” script.

Everyone knows how the TZ episode ends: With David Ellington releasing the Devil back into the world, recapturing him, then losing him again when his housekeeper falls prey to the same doubt that plagued him. But Beaumont’s original story isn’t quite the same. Be sure to check out my follow up post later today where I’ll recap the original alternate ending for you. Then feel free to leave a comment telling me which ending you prefer: the original, or the adaptation. I prefer the TZ ending, as I explained in last year’s “The Devil Made Me Do It” article, but we’ll talk more about that in the next post, “The Howling Man”: The Short Story“.

This one’s for all you fellow scholars and seekers of truth… you’re about to become finders of truth… in the Twilight Zone…

Charles Beaumont and Robin Hughes on Set

Charles Beaumont and Robin Hughes on the set of “The Howling Man”

THE TWILIGHT ZONE

“The Howling Man”

Written by
Charles Beaumont
 
*********
Intro
 

ACT ONE

INT. ELLINGTON’S ROOM – NIGHT

FADE IN and PAN DOWN to a dark and stormy NIGHT.

A man looks out of an open window at the storm and then
turns to reveal his anguished FACE. This is DAVID ELLINGTON
— grim, wild-eyed, graying around the temples — as he
addresses some unseen person urgently, amid the ROAR of
thunder, the HOWL of the wind, and the PATTER of rain.
 
               ELLINGTON
I know. It’s — it’s an incredible story.
I, of all people, know this. And you won’t
believe me. No, not at first. But I’m going
to tell you the whole thing. Then, you will
believe, because you must. You must
believe. It happened many years ago, after
the First World War. I was on a walking
trip through central Europe. But one night,
I… One night, I got lost in a storm.
 
Ellington turns back to the open WINDOW just over his
shoulder where the storm RAGES.

DISSOLVE TO:

1

EXT. THE CASTLE

A similar stormy night, decades earlier. A FLASHBACK to
central Europe, where an imposing, ornate, medieval CASTLE
looms out of the darkness. A younger David Ellington
staggers through the blinding rain to the huge wooden door
of the castle and KNOCKS. A heavily-accented voice from
behind the door answers.
 
               CHRISTOPHORUS
Yes? Who is it?
 
The door swings open to reveal BROTHER CHRISTOPHORUS, a
bearded giant in robes, carrying a long wooden staff and an
ancient lantern.
 
               ELLINGTON
Please, please let me in. I’m lost.
 
               CHRISTOPHORUS
I’m sorry. We don’t allow visitors in the
hermitage.
 
               ELLINGTON
Oh, I-I-I-I’m not a visitor. I-I’m a
stranger here. I-I got lost.
 
Ellington tries to enter but Christophorus blocks the way
with his staff.
 
               ELLINGTON
Oh, you don’t understand. I’m lost.
 
Christophorus looks Ellington over warily and with a barely
perceptible nod, clears the way for him to unsteadily
enter, and closes the door behind him.

CUT TO:

INT. ENTRY HALL 

The castle’s torch-lit ENTRY HALL, primitive, like
something out of the Middle Ages. A soaked, shivering
Ellington, clutching a traveling bag, looks the entry hall
over as Christophorus leads him through it. Other men,
dressed like Christophorus and carrying staffs, appear in
adjacent doorways, staring at Ellington. Ellington, already
weak, suddenly grows dizzy, staggers against a stone
doorway, and has a COUGHING fit. Christophorus turns to
look at him.
 
               ELLINGTON
I-I’ll be all right once I dry out.
 
               CHRISTOPHORUS
Wait here. I have to speak to Brother
Jerome.
 
Christophorus disappears through a doorway as Ellington
drops his traveling bag and puts his back to the doorway,
trying to regain his composure. His eyes widen at the sound
of a wicked HOWL. Is it a wolf? Is he dreaming? The storm
continues to RAGE. Ellington looks around for the source of
the howling as Christophorus returns.
 
               CHRISTOPHORUS
Brother Jerome will see you now.
 
A puzzled Ellington reacts to another evil-sounding HOWL.
 
               ELLINGTON
What was that?
 
               CHRISTOPHORUS
The wind. Come.
 
Unconvinced, Ellington gives Christophorus a long look
before they proceed.
 

2

INT. OFFICE

Christophorus leads Ellington into what passes for an
OFFICE. Seated at an ancient wooden desk before huge
windows that reveal the ongoing storm is
 
BROTHER JEROME — flowing white hair and beard and robes,
very much like Moses — a commanding presence even while
sitting. Jerome glances at Christophorus and then at
Ellington.
 
               JEROME
Why have you come here?
 
               ELLINGTON
My-my name is Ellington. I-I’m on a walking
trip. I got lost in the storm.
 
Ellington has another COUGHING fit. He is clearly in bad
shape, and getting worse.
 
               ELLINGTON
Excuse me. I saw light here.
 
               JEROME
What do you want from us?
 
               ELLINGTON
Shelter. Maybe some food.
 
Jerome shakes his head sorrowfully.
 
               JEROME
We cannot help you. You will have to leave.
         (rises majestically)
Now, Mr. Ellington. Now.
 
In disbelief, a silent Ellington slowly turns and staggers
out of the office.
 

3

INT. ENTRY HALL

But the effort becomes too much for him. Ellington
collapses and passes out. Jerome, Christophorus and the
other men gather around him, making no move to help. An
omniscient NARRATOR has a few things to say about this.
 
               NARRATOR
        (voice over)
The prostrate form of Mr. David Ellington,
scholar, seeker of truth and, regrettably,
finder of truth. A man who will shortly
arise from his exhaustion to confront a
problem that has tormented mankind since
the beginning of time….
 
An image of the narrator, in suit and tie, hands folded
before him, magically appears over the scene, as he
finishes his comments.
 
            NARRATOR
… A man who knocked on a door seeking
sanctuary and found instead the outer edges
of the Twilight Zone.

FADE OUT

INT. ENTRY HALL

FADE IN on a now-conscious Ellington in the empty ENTRY
HALL, later that night. He touches his brow and unsteadily
crosses to an ornate window to look out at the still RAGING
storm. No one else is present. At the sound of more
HOWLING, Ellington turns and follows the noise. He staggers
along, occasionally leaning against a wooden beam or
doorway for support until he comes to a wooden door, held
shut by a staff similar to the ones carried by Jerome,
Christophorus, and the other men. He approaches it
cautiously and peers through the barred window in the door.
 
Ellington and Devil
 
It is a prison cell. Ellington sees a man whose back is
turned towards him — it is THE HOWLING MAN, gaunt, dirty and dressed in rags. But as the Howling Man turns, sees Ellington, and rushes to him, he reveals a gentle, bearded face and a gentle voice. The Howling Man reaches through the barred window and clutches Ellington’s shoulder. Ellington tries to pull away.
 
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
Help me. No, please. In the name of mercy,
help me. You’re not one of them.
 
               ELLINGTON
No. My name’s Ellington. I’m an American.
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
          (releases his grip)
Sshh! We have only moments. Come closer.
Come.
 
Ellington does so.
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
They’re mad, Mister Ellington. All of them.
Raving mad. Listen. I was in the village in
Schwartzof. I was walking in the street
with my woman. We paused to rest by a tree.
And we kissed. Is it wrong to kiss? Tell
me.
 
               ELLINGTON
I-I don’t think so.
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
Of course, you don’t. You don’t think so, I
don’t think so. But Jerome — the lecherous
old fool — We looked up and I saw him
standing close by. I tried to open my mouth
to speak but before I could utter a sound,
he raised that heavy staff he carries —
you’ve seen it? — and he hit me, again and
again.
 
               ELLINGTON
Why?
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
For revenge. Because she refused his
advances. He took his fury out on me.
 
               ELLINGTON
I-I’m sorry. I find this difficult to
believe.
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
Of course, you do, Mister Ellington. That’s
the strength of the man. He makes his
madness seem a harmless thing. The-the-the
madness of a religious zealot. This is not
a religious order, Mister Ellington. These
so-called Brothers of Truth — they’re
outcasts, misfits, cut off from the world
because the world won’t have them. Mister
Ellington, please, you must believe me. I
don’t say they’re evil. I say they’re mad.
 
Ellington starts to walk away. The Howling Man grabs him by
the shoulder.
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
Where’re you going?
 
               ELLINGTON
I’ll speak to Jerome.
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
Noooo. He’s the greatest maniac of them
all.
 
               ELLINGTON
Then, how can I help you?
 
A deep voice rings out.
 
               JEROME
Mister Ellington!
 
Jerome, Christophorus, and a few others stand a few feet
away. Ellington approaches them.
 
               JEROME
I did not know that you were well enough to
walk. Come with me, please.
 
               ELLINGTON
I-I must talk with you.
 
               JEROME
         (pointing)
This way.
 
The other men watch as Jerome and Ellington silently head
back to Jerome’s office. The storm grows worse.
Christophorus gives the Howling Man’s cell a long look.

CUT TO:

7

INT. OFFICE

Jerome and Ellington enter.
 
               JEROME
I must ask you to leave the hermitage,
Mister Ellington. We have no facilities for
the care of the ill. Arrangements
can be made at Schwartzof —
 
               ELLINGTON
Now, just a minute…
 
               JEROME
No, not a minute, not another second,
Mister Ellington. Now!
 
               ELLINGTON
Why?
 
               JEROME
I’ve already explained that.
 
               ELLINGTON
No, you’ve explained nothing.
 
Jerome shuts the door.
 
               ELLINGTON
No one asked me to come here. I realize
that. But that’s no excuse for your
behavior.
 
               JEROME
My son…
 
               ELLINGTON
I’m not your son.
 
               JEROME
You don’t understand.
 
               ELLINGTON
That’s right. I-I don’t. So why don’t you
tell me? Why are you in such a hurry to
have me leave? What are you afraid I’ll
find out? It’s the man you have locked up
in the cell, isn’t it, brother? Well, that
isn’t a secret anymore. I know about him.
 
               JEROME
What man is this, Mister Ellington?
 
               ELLINGTON
The one we just left. The one who’s been
screaming his head off.
 
               JEROME
I’m not sure you know what you’re saying.
Ellington, growing dizzy, takes a seat.
 
               ELLINGTON
Look, brother, I — I don’t know much about
this cult of yours, what’s permitted, what
isn’t permitted. I seriously doubt if you
have the authority to imprison a man
against his will.
 
               JEROME
That is quite true. We have no such
authority.
 
               ELLINGTON
Then why have you done it?
 
               JEROME
No man has ever been imprisoned in the
hermitage, Mister Ellington.
 
               ELLINGTON
I was just talking with him.
 
               JEROME
You talked to no man. You have been very
ill, Mister Ellington. You’ve suffered
delirium.
 
Jerome puts a sympathetic hand on Ellington’s shoulder just
as a piercing HOWL causes Ellington to bolt out of his
chair. He backs away from Jerome.
 
               ELLINGTON
Oh, no. Don’t tell me you didn’t hear that.
Honest men make unconvincing liars.
 
A wicked clap of THUNDER punctuates the comment.
 
               ELLINGTON
I’ll find out eventually, you know.
 
               JEROME
What do you mean?
 
               ELLINGTON
Just what I said. The police will be very
interested to learn that you’re keeping a
man imprisoned here —
 
               JEROME
I tell you, there is no man.
 
               ELLINGTON
All right, all right. Just… forget it.
 
Jerome watches with concern as Ellington crosses to the
door, opens it, and starts to leave.
 
               JEROME
Mister Ellington.
 
Ellington stops and turns.
 
               ELLINGTON
Yes?
 
               JEROME
Would you really go to the police?
 
               ELLINGTON
Would you?
 
Another clap of THUNDER.
 
               JEROME
Very well. I told you the truth but only
part of it. Now, I see I shall have to tell
you the whole truth. Shut the door, Mister
Ellington.
 
Ellington shuts the door just as a particularly long, sad
HOWL causes Jerome to wince and put his hand to his ears.
Ellington looks relieved.
 
               ELLINGTON
Then you do hear it.
 
               JEROME
As I have heard it every hour of every day
for five long years.
 
Jerome crosses to the window.
 
               ELLINGTON
Why did you lie?
 
               JEROME
I didn’t. When I told you that no man
howled at the hermitage, I was being
perfectly honest. What you saw is not a
man. It is the Devil himself!
  
This rates two claps of THUNDER and a FADE OUT on Jerome’s
ominous, lightning-lit face.
 

END OF ACT ONE

ACT TWO

the devil

INT. OFFICE

FADE IN on Jerome, still at the window, moments later.

               JEROME
Yes, the Devil himself. What you saw in the
cell is Satan, otherwise known as the Dark
Angel, Ahriman, Asmodeus, Belial, Diabolus,
the Devil. You asked for the truth. Now you
have it. You do believe me, don’t you?
 
               ELLINGTON
Ah, sure. Of course.
 
Ellington starts backing away from a wild-eyed Jerome who
rants on.
 
               JEROME
No. Now, it is you who are lying, Mister
Ellington. You don’t believe me at all.
Quite to the contrary. You’re now quite
certain of what you suspected, that I am
mad. Sit down, Mister Ellington. And we’ll
see.
 
Ellington sits.
 
               JEROME
Let me tell you a story and we’ll see how
certain you are that I am mad. How certain
you are of anything.
 
Jerome walks away from Ellington and begins pacing around
the room through the following:
 
               JEROME
I suppose you fancy yourself a
sophisticated man. You consider us to be
primitive because we live here in solitude,
away from the so-called real world. We are
misfits.
 
               ELLINGTON
Oh, no, no.
 
               JEROME
Oh, please. I know all the theories.
 
               ELLINGTON
I assure you, brother, that–
 
               JEROME
No, Mister Ellington, it is I who am
assuring you that I am not the ignorant
fanatic I would appear. Oh, I coped with
your world for forty years, and rather
successfully, at that. The best schools, a
degree in philosophy, a job that took me to
the ends of the earth. This beard, this
staff, and this faith are merely the
results of a different point of view. If
you can understand that, you can listen to
what I have to say with an open mind.
 
Another wicked HOWL unnerves Ellington, but Jerome takes it
in stride.
 
               JEROME
Five years ago, there were no howls in the
hermitage. It was simply the bombed-out
ruin of an old castle belonging to the
family Wulfran. Baron Wulfran gave it to
the Brotherhood of Truth as a gesture of
charity. Our job was to tend the vineyards
and save what souls we could by constant
prayer.
 
               ELLINGTON
But this isn’t a religious order, is it,
brother?
 
               JEROME
We feel that we are recognized by God.
Truth is our dogma. We believe it to be
man’s greatest weapon against the Devil,
who is the father of all lies.
 
Ellington rises.
 
               ELLINGTON
All right, go on with your story. You were
tending the vineyards.
 
               JEROME
At that time, shortly after the Great War,
the world was in chaos. Everywhere was
unhappiness. Except in this little village
below.
 
Jerome points a finger toward a rain-streaked window.
 
               JEROME
For some reason the people of Schwartzof
refused to yield to despair. They lost none
of their faith. They continued as they had
been for centuries. Honest, God-fearing,
and happy. This village was a plum to
Satan, one he could not resist. So, he came
here and embarked upon a program of
corruption.
 
               ELLINGTON
But you stopped him.
 
               JEROME
Yes! You see, Mister Ellington…
 
A quick clap of THUNDER for punctuation. As Jerome
approaches Ellington ominously.
 
               JEROME
… he made the same mistake that you have
made. He underestimated me. He thought he
would have no difficulty in tempting the
old fool.
 
Ellington backs away and sits again.
 
               JEROME
But I had him in a cell before he knew what
happened.
 
               ELLINGTON
But, if he’s the Devil, how do you keep him
locked up?
 
               JEROME
With the Staff of Truth!
 
8
 
A wild-eyed Jerome flourishes his staff above his head
dramatically and then lowers it.
 
               JEROME
The one barrier he cannot pass.
 
               ELLINGTON
Tell me, how did you recognize him? He
doesn’t look evil.
 
               JEROME
The Devil hath power to assume a pleasing
shape. I had seen him before, in all parts
of the world. In all forms and guises.
Wherever there was sin. Wherever there was
strife. Wherever there was corruption. And
persecution. There he was also. Sometimes
he was only a spectator, a face in the
crowd. But, always, he was there.
 
Jerome pounds his staff on the floor insistently. All this
is too much for Ellington who again grows dizzy, swaying in
his chair.
 
               JEROME
Now… you see, I hope, why you must say
nothing of what you’ve seen and heard here.
 
Ellington rises again.
 
               ELLINGTON
Brother… Not that I doubt you, you
understand, only… Well, isn’t it possible
you might have made a mistake?
 
               JEROME
No! Think, Mister Ellington. Think of the
peace of the world these last five years.
Think of this country now.
               (MORE)
 
               JEROME (CONT’D)
Is there another like it?
 
               ELLINGTON
You haven’t put an end to-to suffering.
There’s still murders, robberies. Even now
while we’re talking, people are starving.
 
               JEROME
The suffering man was meant to endure. We
cause most of our own grief. We need no
help from him. It is the unnatural
catastrophe, the great wars, the
overwhelming pestilences, the wholesale
sinning that we have stopped.
 
               ELLINGTON
I believe you, brother.
 
               JEROME
Do you truly?
 
               ELLINGTON
Yes. I-I admit I was doubtful at first but
you’ve convinced me. Absolutely. I-I
promise to keep your secret.
 
               JEROME
Good, my son. Tomorrow, if you feel well
enough, you may leave.
 
Jerome crosses to the door and opens it for Ellington.
 
               JEROME
In the meantime, Brother Christophorus will
look after you.
 
Ellington starts out the door.
 
               JEROME
Please. Go directly to his room.
 
               ELLINGTON
Good night, brother.
 

9

INT. OUTSIDE THE HOWLING MAN’S CELL

Ellington, sick and dizzy, rubs his stiff neck as he makes
his way to the Howling Man’s cell. Ellington grins when he
sees the Man’s scared, hopeful face in the barred window.
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
He lied to you, didn’t he? I can see that.
What’d he say?
 
               ELLINGTON
He said that you were the Devil.
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
         (nearly laughs)
The Devil! That’s good. That’s wonderful.
What a dream for an old devil, to catch the
Devil and lock him up.
         (suddenly concerned)
You don’t believe him, do you?
 
               ELLINGTON
No, of course not.
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
Then help me.
 
               ELLINGTON
Look, why don’t I just go get the
authorities?
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
It would be my death warrant. The
authorities would return and find nothing.
Jerome is mad, but he’s shrewd, too.
 
A hand appears on Ellington’s shoulder. He turns to see it
belongs to Brother Christophorus.
 
               CHRISTOPHORUS
         (politely)
Brother Jerome was fearful you might lose
your way. Come.
 
Christophorus leads Ellington away. The Howling Man watches
them go, a mixture of hope and fear in his face.

CUT TO:

10

INT. CHRISTOPHORUS’ ROOM

Moments later, Christophorus enters with Ellington and
shuts the door behind them. Christophorus starts to put a
key in the lock but Ellington grabs his arm.
 
               ELLINGTON
Why are you locking the door?
 
               CHRISTOPHORUS
        (as if it were obvious)
To protect you. Rest now, Mister Ellington.
        (locks the door)
Remember, you’re still a very sick man.

DISSOLVE TO:

11

INT. CHRISTOPHORUS’ ROOM

Later that night. As Christophorus sleeps, Ellington
carefully steals the key chain from around his neck.
Collecting his coat, Ellington stealthily unlocks the door,
opens it, exits, closes it, and then takes one last look at
the sleeping Christophorus through the door’s window before
hurrying away.

CUT TO:

INT. OUTSIDE THE HOWLING MAN’S CELL

A weakened, dizzy Ellington approaches.
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
You’ve come. Good.
 
               ELLINGTON
What do you want me to do?
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
Lift off the wooden bolt.
 
Ellington looks at the wooden staff that bolts the door
shut. It appears easily removable and well within the
Howling Man’s reach.
 
               ELLINGTON
       (astonished)
Is this all that holds you in?
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
Yes. Lift it off.
 
               ELLINGTON
        (confused)
Why haven’t you done it yourself?
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
Please. There’s no time for talk. Mister
Ellington, in the name of mercy — If you
fail now, they’ll kill both of us. Don’t
you understand that?

CUT TO:

INT. CHRISTOPHORUS’ ROOM

Christophorus awakes with a start, sees that the keys and
Ellington have vanished, rises and crosses to the door.
It’s locked.

CUT TO:

13

INT. OUTSIDE THE HOWLING MAN’S CELL

Ellington starts to remove the staff. He is suddenly having
serious doubts. He lets go of the staff.
 
               THE HOWLING MAN
Hurry. Hurry.

CUT TO:

INT. CHRISTOPHORUS’ ROOM

Christophorus pounds on the door and yells.
 
               CHRISTOPHORUS
Stop! Stop! Stop! Stop!

CUT TO:

INT. OUTSIDE THE HOWLING MAN’S CELL

Ellington, hearing the yells, panics and quickly removes
the staff. The cell door slowly swings open and there is a
horrific moment of uncertainty as the Howling Man steps
out, a wide grin on his face. Ellington hands him his coat.
 
               ELLINGTON
Put this on, the storm.
 
14
 
The Howling Man drapes the coat over his shoulders as
Ellington looks around nervously. Ellington is about to
lead him to safety when, to the accompaniment of a long
roll of THUNDER, the Howling Man points a bony finger at
Ellington’s back, whereupon Ellington instantly loses
control of his body and collapses to the floor. After a
sidelong glance to assure himself that his captors are too
late, the Howling Man allows a dark look to cross his face.
His features begin to subtly change. He smiles, strokes his
beard, and strides off. A prostrate Ellington watches in
horror as, with every step, the Howling Man slowly
transforms himself into a hideous horned demon.
 
Devil transform 8
 
The coat draped over his shoulders transforms into a cloak. When at last the Devil reaches the wall opposite his cell, he turns back to Ellington, wraps the cloak about himself, smiles grimly, and disappears in a puff of smoke. A stunned Ellington passes out. Jerome and Christophorus arrive. Jerome peers into the empty cell while Christophorus glances sympathetically at Ellington. Jerome and Christophorus exchange looks. Christophorus walks off while Jerome crosses to Ellington, now regaining consciousness. Jerome puts an arm around him.
 
               JEROME
I’m sorry for you, my son. All your life,
you will remember this night. And you’ll
know, Mister Ellington, whom you have
turned loose upon the world.
 
               ELLINGTON
I-I didn’t believe you. I saw him and
didn’t recognize him.
 
               JEROME
That is man’s weakness… and Satan’s
strength.
 
15
 
Ellington stares hard in the direction of the Devil’s
escape.
 
               ELLINGTON
       (voice over)
In that moment, I decided to spend the rest
of my life tracking him down. To recapture
the evil I’d released.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. THE CASTLE

A view of the CASTLE in the storm that night.
 
               ELLINGTON
         (voice over)
The evil that soon took the shape of the
Second World War, the Korean War, the
hideous new weapons of war. I swore I’d
find him again, as Brother Jerome had done.

DISSOLVE TO:

19

INT. ELLINGTON’S ROOM

A very small version of the wooden Staff of Truth as it
keeps a 1960s-style door shut.
 
               ELLINGTON
       (voice over)
It took many years but I did it. See? I
have him in there now.
 
A hand gestures toward the door. The hand belongs to
Ellington — he appears now as he did in the first scene:
older and grayer and as wild-eyed as Brother Jerome. He
turns and crosses to his HOUSEKEEPER. Ellington has been
telling his story to her, apparently in a ROOM of
Ellington’s house.
 
               ELLINGTON
You understand now. You understand why you
must not under any circumstances go near
that door. You see how important it is that
he stay locked up?
 
The housekeeper looks at him as if he’s crazy but nods her
assent.
 
               ELLINGTON
Good. I’m sending him back to Brother
Jerome. He’ll do a bit of howling but, heh,
pay no attention to that. It’s a trick. I
know. Yes, I must go now.
 
Ellington crosses to his raincoat and puts it on.
 
               ELLINGTON
Must go. I-I have preparations to make. I-I’ll
be back in just a few minutes.
 
Ellington grabs his hat and heads for the door. The storm
continues. He pauses and turns back to the housekeeper.
 
               ELLINGTON
           (gravely)
Remember. Remember. Keep that door locked.
 
17
 
Ellington leaves, shutting the door behind him. The
housekeeper turns and stares for a long moment at the
bolted door in disbelief — until a wicked, piercing HOWL
emerges from the other side. Startled, she crosses to the
door and hesitantly removes the wooden staff.
 
               NARRATOR
        (voice over)
Ancient folk saying: “You can catch the
Devil, but you can’t hold him long.” …
 
The housekeeper turns the knob and opens the door.
 
               NARRATOR
       (voice over)
… Ask Brother Jerome. Ask David
Ellington. …
 
The door swings open to reveal part of the darkened,
shadowy ROOM on the other side.
 
(The interior of the locked room -- not easily visible when watching the episode, but how beautifully clever and subtle -- a chair with carved devil heads!)

(The interior of the locked room — not easily visible when watching the episode, but how beautifully clever and subtle — a chair with carved devil heads!)

 
               NARRATOR
        (voice over)
… They know, and they’ll go on knowing to
the end of their days… and beyond… in
the Twilight Zone.
 

PAN UP, DISSOLVE TO and FADE OUT on a starry night SKY.

THE END

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